Prevention Lane http://www.preventionlane.org at Lane County Public Health Fri, 23 Jan 2015 22:47:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 ‘App’rehensive: The Blurring Lines of Gaming and Gambling, and Protecting Our Most Vulnerablehttp://www.preventionlane.org/apprehensive-blurring-lines-gaming-gambling-protecting-vulnerable http://www.preventionlane.org/apprehensive-blurring-lines-gaming-gambling-protecting-vulnerable#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 22:22:58 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9801 2015 Iowa Department of Public Health Webinar: ‘App’rehensive: The Blurring Lines of Gaming and Gambling, and Protecting Our Most Vulnerable Welcome to participants of the February 11, 2015 Iowa Department of Public Health webinar.  This presentation will examine the rapidly-shifting world of technology that has outpaced even many experts’ abilities to keep up. From video games […]

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2015 Iowa Department of Public Health Webinar:
‘App’rehensive: The Blurring Lines of Gaming and Gambling, and Protecting Our Most Vulnerable

Welcome to participants of the February 11, 2015 Iowa Department of Public Health webinar.  This presentation will examine the rapidly-shifting world of technology that has outpaced even many experts’ abilities to keep up. From video games to social network gaming, we look into recent trends with regard to online and mobile technology and play, and how the lines has become blurred between traditional “games” and gambling. including the examination of various parallels with gambling and gambling disorders. And we aren’t just stuck in the problem: we will talk about practical and evidence-based tips and tools that aim at protecting, and advocating for, vulnerable populations – with a special focus on youth and those in addictions recovery.

Slides will be posted here following the webinar (with clickable links included for references). Keep in mind that these presentations are Creative Commons copyrighted, so please do contact us for materials. We are happy to share resources.

 

 

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CDC Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesityhttp://www.preventionlane.org/cdc-recommended-community-strategies-measurements-prevent-obesity-2 http://www.preventionlane.org/cdc-recommended-community-strategies-measurements-prevent-obesity-2#comments Tue, 20 Jan 2015 23:56:03 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9733 CDC’s Goal: To recommend a set of obesity prevention strategies and corresponding measurements, or indicators, that local governments can use to plan, implement, and monitor policy and environmental initiatives to prevent obesity. Strategies to Promote the Availability of Affordable Healthy Food & Beverages Increase availability of healthier food and beverage choices in public service venues […]

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CDC’s Goal:

To recommend a set of obesity prevention strategies and corresponding measurements, or indicators, that local governments can use to plan, implement, and monitor policy and environmental initiatives to prevent obesity.

Strategies to Promote the Availability of Affordable Healthy Food & Beverages

  1. Increase availability of healthier food and beverage choices in public service venues
  2. Improve availability of affordable healthier food and beverage choices in public service venues
  3. Improve geographic availability of supermarkets in underserved areas
  4. Provide incentives to food retailers to locate in and/or offer healthier  food and beverage choices in underserved areas
  5. Improve availability of mechanisms for purchasing foods from farms
  6. Provide incentives for the production, distribution, and procurement of foods from local farms

Strategies to Support Healthy Food and Beverage Choices

  1. Restrict availability of less healthy foods and beverages in public service venues
  2. Institute smaller portion size options in public service venues
  3. Limit advertisements of less healthy foods and beverages
  4. Discourage consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages

Strategy to Encourage Breastfeeding

  1. Increase support for breastfeeding

Strategies to Encourage Physical Activity or Limit Sedentary Activity Among Children and Youth

  1. Require Physical Education in schools
  2. Increase the amount of physical activity in PE programs in schools
  3. Increase opportunities for extracurricular physical activity
  4. Reduce screen time in public service venues

Strategies to Create Safe Communities That Support Physical Activity

  1. Improve access to outdoor recreational facilities
  2. Enhance infrastructure supporting bicycling
  3. Enhance infrastructure supporting walking
  4. Support locating  schools in residential neighborhoods
  5. Improve access to transportation
  6. Zone for mixed-use development
  7. Enhance personal safety where people are or could be physically active
  8. Enhance traffic safety in areas where persons are or could be physically active

Strategy to Encourage Communities to Organize for Change

  1. Participate in community coalitions or partnerships to address obesity
Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity in the United States: Implementation and Measurement Guide, July 2009 

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National Drug Facts Awareness Weekhttp://www.preventionlane.org/national-drug-facts-awareness-week http://www.preventionlane.org/national-drug-facts-awareness-week#comments Tue, 20 Jan 2015 23:35:36 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9749 National Drug Facts Awareness Week is January 26-February 1! Drug overdose death rates in the United States have more than tripled since 1990 and have never been higher -- and most of these deaths are from prescription drugs (source: CDC).  Deaths from prescription painkillers have reached epidemic levels in the past decade, and according to the Centers […]

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National Drug Facts Awareness Week is January 26-February 1!

Take the National Drug IQ Challenge!
NIH's 2014 Monitoring the Future survey shows high rates of e-cigarette use and fewer concerns about marijuana’s risks.

Drug overdose death rates in the United States have more than tripled since 1990 and have never been higher -- and most of these deaths are from prescription drugs (source: CDC).  Deaths from prescription painkillers have reached epidemic levels in the past decade, and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 16,500 people died from painkiller overdoses in 2010.

Overdose deaths are only part of the problem—for each death involving prescription painkillers, hundreds of people abuse or misuse these drugs:

  • Emergency department visits for prescription painkiller abuse or misuse have doubled in the past 5 years to nearly half a million.
  • About 12 million American teens and adults reported using prescription painkillers to get “high” or for other nonmedical reasons.
  • Nonmedical use of prescription painkillers costs more than $72.5 billion each year in direct health care costs.

(Above information quoted from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Saving Lives and Protecting People: Preventing Prescription Painkiller Overdoses)

One in five teens abuse prescription drugs.

Infographic on Prescription Drug Abuse Among Youth (Source: NIDA)

Prescription drug infographic: NIDA

Click infographic to enlarge. Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Top Graph: Past Year Drug Abuse Among High School Seniors Graph. After marijuana, prescription and over-the-counter medications account for most of the past-year use of commonly abused drugs among high school seniors. Data are for past-year use of prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

Bottom Left Image. About 1 in 9 youth or 11.4 percent of young people aged 12 to 25 used prescription drugs nonmedically within the past year. (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2010)

Bottom Right Graphic. Twenty-five percent of those who began abusing prescription drugs at age 13 or younger met clinical criteria for addiction sometime in their life. (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2010)

Does your "don't do drugs" talk include what you'll find in your home medicine cabinet? Find out more about what you can do to help prevent prescription drug abuse.

Key Links:

"Not in My House" [Partnership for Drug-Free America]

For parents: Facts, photos, and data on prescription drugs [KeepRxSafe.com]

Prescription Drug Child Safety Fact Page [DrugAlert.org]

Is Your Teen or Child Buying Prescription Drugs Online? [Psychology Today Online]

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Adverse Childhood Experiences / Traumahttp://www.preventionlane.org/adverse-childhood-experiences-trauma http://www.preventionlane.org/adverse-childhood-experiences-trauma#comments Thu, 15 Jan 2015 19:11:45 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9610 Early childhood experiences have lasting, measurable consequences later in life; therefore, fostering emotional well-being from the earliest stages of life helps build a foundation for overall health and well-being.  National Prevention Council, National Prevention Strategy, 2011.   From results of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, we have learned that traumatic events and experiences that […]

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Early childhood experiences have lasting, measurable consequences later in life; therefore, fostering emotional well-being from the earliest stages of life helps build a foundation for overall health and well-being.  National Prevention Council, National Prevention Strategy, 2011.

 

From results of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, we have learned that traumatic events and experiences that occur early in life have an impact on the health and social-emotional well-being throughout the lifespan. Examples of traumatic events include physical and sexual abuse, neglect, loss of a parent/caregiver due to death, abandonment, incarceration or divorce, and exposure to violence and substance use.

 

To reduce the impact of traumatic events and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and increase mental wellness, we need to:

  • Increase our understanding and awareness of trauma and ACEs
  • Provide trauma-informed care and services
  • Increase parent/guardian/family support and education
  • Invest in prevention and resiliency practices and programs
  • Develop nurturing, resilient and trauma-informed communities

To learn more, check out these resources:

Links

ACEs Connection

This “community of practice” focuses on trauma-informed, resilience-building practices to prevent ACEs.  It includes a multitude of news, resources and social networking opportunities.

 ACEs Too High

Includes general information about ACEs, numerous resources and resources on ACEs and child abuse prevention, and trauma-informed practices.

 Adverse Childhood Experiences, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

This section on the SAMHSA website includes information about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study, the relationship of ACEs to substance use and behavioral health problems and how to incorporate efforts between these fields, and other resources.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Includes information about child maltreatment violence prevention, risk and protective factors, details about the ACE study, and statistics.

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Provides a multitude of resources on child abuse prevention, strengthening families, and evidence-based practices.

Making Connections:  Promoting Mental Wellness & Reducing Adverse Childhood Experiences

Includes workshop and keynote presentations from the November 2014 conference.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Provides information about various topics about trauma including types, culture and trauma, economic stress, evidence-based treatment and services, and tips on creating trauma-informed systems

The Resilience Project

This project from the American Academy of Pediatrics offers healthcare providers tools they can use to better identify, treat and refer children and youth impacted by ACEs.  It also includes tools for communities, families, children and parents.

Trauma-Informed Oregon

This resource serves as a centralized source of information and resources for Oregon.   Includes basics about trauma-informed principles and practices, training and education, organizational resources, and happenings across the state.

Trauma Informed Care, National Council for Behavioral Health

Includes an overview of trauma-informed care, resources on trauma-informed consulting and the infographic, How to Manage Trauma.

faces

Print Materials

2014 Prevention Resource Guide:  Making Meaningful Connections 

2014 Prevention Resource Guide_ Making Meaningful Connection

ACEs Brief 2014: ACEs Prevalence, Scores, and Health Outcomes (Oregon)

ACEs Brief 2014

Building Resiliency:  Preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), Oregon Health Authority

Building Resiliency and Reducing ACEs OHA

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study:  How are findings being applied in Oregon? The Ford Family Foundation, 2014

OR ACE Study Report

 Trauma-Informed Care, CD Summary, Oregon Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority, 2014

CD Summary Trauma Informed Care

 

 

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Lane County Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinancehttp://www.preventionlane.org/lane-county-tobacco-retail-licensing-ordinance http://www.preventionlane.org/lane-county-tobacco-retail-licensing-ordinance#comments Tue, 30 Dec 2014 22:04:44 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9593 On December 16, 2014, the Lane County Board of Commissioners passed a Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinance. Following are frequently asked questions about the ordinance. Frequently Asked Questions: Lane County Tobacco Ordinance 14-17 Q: Does this ordinance apply to my business? A: This ordinance applies to your business if you can answer yes to both of the following […]

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On December 16, 2014, the Lane County Board of Commissioners passed a Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinance. Following are frequently asked questions about the ordinance.

Frequently Asked Questions: Lane County Tobacco Ordinance 14-17

Q: Does this ordinance apply to my business?

A: This ordinance applies to your business if you can answer yes to both of the following questions: Are you located in an unincorporated area of Lane County (outside the boundaries of any city)?  Do you sell any tobacco or electronic smoking devices or related products?

Lane-County-Tobacco-Retail-License-Ordinance

Lane County’s Tobacco Retail License Ordinance
(click to enlarge)

Q: When does this ordinance take effect?

A: January 15th, 2015

 Q: Who do I contact with questions about licensing?

A: Staff are working on the application form and the Board still needs to set the fee. Once these pieces are complete, Lane County Public Health will be conducting outreach to businesses to share further details. In the meantime, owners of businesses may leave their contact information with Lane County Environmental Health at 541-682-4480.

Q: I have stores both in cities & in unincorporated.  Do I need to apply for the stores in cities?

A: No, only stores in unincorporated areas of Lane County are covered by this ordinance.

 

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Information on Legal Issues Raised During Public Hearing on the Lane County Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinancehttp://www.preventionlane.org/legal-issues-raised-public-hearing-lane-county-tobacco-retail-licensing-ordinance http://www.preventionlane.org/legal-issues-raised-public-hearing-lane-county-tobacco-retail-licensing-ordinance#comments Tue, 30 Dec 2014 21:53:54 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9590 See also: Lane County Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinance By Stephen Brown, Lane County Prevention Team, with input from staff at the Public Health Law Center, especially Maureen O’Brien. There were three key legal issues raised: That discounts should not be banned as they are a form of advertising and protected as free speech under the first […]

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See also: Lane County Tobacco Retail Licensing Ordinance

By Stephen Brown, Lane County Prevention Team, with input from staff at the Public Health Law Center, especially Maureen O’Brien.

There were three key legal issues raised:

  • That discounts should not be banned as they are a form of advertising and protected as free speech under the first amendment.
  • That not allowing transfer of tobacco retail licenses of businesses that are located with 1000 feet of schools amounts to a “taking” because of the adverse impact of the value of a business for someone wishing to sell their business.
  • That applying some of the license fees to “Community Education” is using the fee as an illegal tax on tobacco.

Amendments proposed were to remove the following sections:

  • 752 (k) – (n)
  • 754 (1)
  • 766 – words “and community”
  • Discount rule- As long as a minimum price is established, in this case by prohibiting sales below list price, advertising discounts can be prohibited, because advertising an illegal sale is not protected speech and the economic transaction can be prohibited. A prohibition on selling tobacco at a discount is just a rule about a sales practice. The First Amendment protects speech, including (to some degree) commercial speech such as advertising. But generally it does not reach sales practices, so a prohibition on discounts does not violate the First Amendment. Then, once the sales practice of discounting is prohibited, the First Amendment is out of the picture when it comes to advertising that practice.  The U.S Supreme Court has specifically held: “offers to engage in illegal transactions are categorically excluded from First Amendment protection.” United States v. Williams, 533 U.S. 285, 297. (2008)  Courts in Providence, Rhode Island and NYC have both upheld very similar discount prohibitions against First Amendment challenge. The language in NYC was essentially identical to this one, with only a few differences in definitions.
  • Regulatory Takings.

Short version:

These kind of  “grandfathering” provisions, which let existing stores stay open after the laws change, but that prohibit them from moving or expanding or being sold to a new owner, are pretty common ways to address changes in land use laws. If there was a huge constitutional problem with them it would be unlikely we’d see so many of these provisions. In addition, the fact that there is a significant public health argument in support of the regulation, and the fact that the economic impact on a business is small, both weigh strongly in favor of the law.  The stores don’t have to close, they can stay open as long as they want and they can keep making money. The only restriction is on the ability to sell to a new owner. And in reality, there was never a guarantee that they would have been able to sell, or for how much, at some undetermined future date. Courts in Oregon have held that reasonable business owners must anticipate the possibility that laws will change in the future.

Longer version:

“Takings” claims come from the 5th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which says that if the government takes private property for public use, it must compensate the property owner. The traditional version of a takings is when the government wants to build something like a road or a park, but someone already owns the land. In that case, the government would have to pay the owners to take the land to build the road or park.  The idea of a “regulatory takings” came up as people argued that in some cases, regulations can be so severe that they “take” property in a similar manner to a physical taking.

Not all restrictions imposed by the government which cost businesses money will count as a “regulatory takings.” As one court put it, “Government hardly could go on if to some extent values incident to property could not be diminished without paying for every such change in the general law.” Pa. Coal Co. v. Mahon, 260 U.S. 393, 413 (1922). Compensation is required only when the regulation goes “too far.” As you can imagine, what counts as “too far” has been the subject of many court cases.  Generally, if the regulation deprives the owner of all economic benefits, that goes too far. But when the economic impact is less than that, courts often look at 3 factors: (1) the economic impact of the regulation; (2) the degree of interference with the owner’s reasonable “investment-backed expectations”; and (3) the character of the governmental action.  In other words, courts consider the public benefit of the law, and weigh it against potential harms.

The Oregon Court of Appeals has explained that with regulatory takings the court gives a lot of weight to the public benefit of the law: “no ‘set formula’ determines whether an unconstitutional taking has occurred. Instead, a court must engage in an essentially ad hoc, factual inquiry that considers whether the land use regulation ‘substantially advance[s] legitimate state interests’ and ‘does not den[y] an owner economically viable use of his land.’ Thus, when the government regulates property without physically occupying it, the Takings Clause is much less protective of the interests of the property owner and much more deferential to the public interests served.” Rogers Mach., Inc. v. Washington Cnty., 181 Or. App. 369, 382-83, 45 P.3d 966, 973 (2002)

In reality, this kind of grandfathering provision impacts only a small part of the whole economic value of the business.  Ability to sell [and transfer the tobacco license] is really only one aspect of the value of the business, so the rule does not deny the owner all economically viable use of their business. It just reduces one aspect of potential, future profits. The business is clearly still viable even under the new law.

Second, one might argue that whether or not one will be able to sell their business at some undetermined point in the future is a hypothetical economic benefit. It’s arguably not a concrete enough interest to give a business owner a right to demand compensation from the government. In other words, it’s not a reasonable expectation. All kinds of things could happen, including the market for the product disappearing, the neighborhood changing around the store, or new laws being passed by the government.  The Supreme Court in Oregon has suggested it is not reasonable to assume that laws will always stay the same: “Even if reasonable investment-backed expectations are a legitimate factor to be considered in takings analyses under Article I, section 18, an  issue that we specifically do not decide here, we believe that the result in this case would be the same, because, under these circumstances, any investment-backed expectations petitioners may have had were not reasonable. To be reasonable, investment-backed expectations must take into account the current state of the law, as well as the government’s power to change the law.” Dodd v. Hood River Cnty., 317 Or. 172, 185, 855 P.2d 608, 615-16 (1993).

  • License Fee vs. Tax:

License Fee vs Tax. Usually, the issue of whether something is a fee vs. a tax centers on whether the amount charged is based on the cost of administering the new regulation, or whether it’s an arbitrary number that’s really just a way to raise money for general government purposes. (Money for general purposes is often viewed as a tax)  So the dissenters were probably hearing arguments that “community education” is not something a government would normally do when it passes a new law, so “community education” shouldn’t be included as part of the calculation for the license fee. The argument would be that it’s not fairly within the “costs of administration” of the license.

However, a strong argument can be made that educating the community will help with enforcement of the new law, and therefore it is a cost directly related to administration of the license. First, because if the County would like support from the community in enforcing the law, for example, by having people report violations they see at stores, the community needs to know what the rules are. The County might also use youth to do undercover purchases at stores to test retailer compliance, and that might be considered community education as well. In addition, current retailers are not the only people who might eventually want to sell tobacco. Having information out in the general public helps so that new applicants for a retailer license won’t be surprised to find out what the rules are, and so they won’t start building a business plan only to learn at the last minute there are rules they didn’t factor in to that plan. In fact, it will help new retailers know whether they are required to hold a license in the first place, which is clearly an important first step to compliance!

 

I found a few Oregon cases which suggest this general distinction between tax and license fees applies in Oregon, but obviously on short timeline I haven’t had the opportunity to fully dig into the question:

  1. “It is sometimes difficult to distinguish between a tax and a license. Generally speaking, a tax is a charge or burden imposed on persons or property for the support of the government or for some specific purpose authorized by it. Its object is to raise revenue. Bouvier, Law Dic. A license, however, is a permission to do what would otherwise be unlawful. The fee or charge often exacted therefor is in law supposed to cover the cost of issuing the license and the expenses incident to regulating and controlling the business, although it may ultimately result in a source of revenue.”  Reser v. Umatilla Cnty., 48 Or. 326, 329, 86 P. 595, 597 (1906)
  2. “It is well established that a license imposed for regulatory purposes should not materially exceed the expense of issuing the license, and of necessary inspection and regulation of the business licensed.” Eugene Theatre Co. v. City of Eugene, 194 Or. 603, 613, 243 P.2d 1060, 1065 (1952)

 

Basically the three issues are:  1) The discounts that are prohibited. 2) The idea that not allowing transfer of the licenses for businesses within 1000 feet of schools amounts to a “taking” because of the impact on the value of the business for someone wishing to sell their business. 3) That applying some of the license fee to “Community Education” amounts to an illegal tax on tobacco products.

I feel that I have some understanding of the discount issue, but let me know if there’s more that I should know. My understanding is that as long as a minimum price is established, in this case by prohibiting sales below list price, advertising discounts can be prohibited, because advertising an illegal sale is not protected speech and the economic transaction can be prohibited. The other two issues, I am not so clear on. Any information you have would be helpful.

The amendments proposed by one of the dissenting commissioners was to remove:

  • 752 (k) – (n)
  • 754 (1)
  • 766 – words “and community”

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Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)http://www.preventionlane.org/sbirt http://www.preventionlane.org/sbirt#comments Mon, 22 Dec 2014 01:10:06 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9212 Drug and alcohol misuse are a serious problem both nationally and in Lane County. Alcohol is the most commonly abused drug among youth in the United States. People who start drinking before age 15 are 5x more likely to develop abuse or dependence later in life than those who start after age 21. Between 2008-2010 […]

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Drug and alcohol misuse are a serious problem both nationally and in Lane County. Alcohol is the most commonly abused drug among youth in the United States. People who start drinking before age 15 are 5x more likely to develop abuse or dependence later in life than those who start after age 21. Between 2008-2010 the National Survey on Drug Use and Health estimated that nearly 25,000 Lane County residents aged 12 and older met the DSM-IV criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence. Primary care providers are an ideal place to help identify and refer to treatment those Lane County residents with alcohol and/or drug dependence. Below are some tools to help you implement SBIRT into your practice.

  • OHSU put together this website, where you can find almost everything you need to implement SBIRT  in a Primary Care setting. You’ll find everything from training videos to information on clinic flow and downloadable screening forms and exam room posters.
  • For more in-depth information on SBIRT for the Medicaid population and billing through OHP, the Oregon Health Authority created this  Guidance document.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also created this Implementation Guide, which can take you step by step through implementing SBIRT in your practice.

 

 

Pictured:  Alcohol, drug and PHQ-9 (depression) screenings at a PeaceHealth primary care office in Eugene.

Pictured: Alcohol, drug and PHQ-9 (depression) screening forms at a PeaceHealth primary care office in Eugene.

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Current Conditions in Lane County Youth: Making the Connections with Prevention & Juvenile Justicehttp://www.preventionlane.org/data-pscc http://www.preventionlane.org/data-pscc#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:22:13 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/?p=9580 Presentation to the Juvenile Justice Subcommittee of the Public Safety Coordinating Council, 12/19/14 [View as PDF] Some Data Sources: Lane County’s Epidemiological Data on Alcohol, Drugs, and Mental Health Oregon Student Wellness Survey – Lane County DHS County Quick Facts Lane County Tobacco Fact Sheet Status of Oregon’s Children County Data Book Vital Statistics: County […]

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Presentation to the Juvenile Justice Subcommittee of the Public Safety Coordinating Council, 12/19/14

[View as PDF]

Some Data Sources:

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Tips for a safe and happy holiday seasonhttp://www.preventionlane.org/holiday-tips http://www.preventionlane.org/holiday-tips#comments Sat, 06 Dec 2014 04:33:18 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/holiday-tips.htm/ Tips to Help Enjoy a Safe & Happy Holiday Season While intended to be “merry and bright,” the holidays can be a stressful time for many of us. Check out the tips below to help enjoy a safe and happy holiday season. Know someone who is depressed or suicidal? Get resources here. Life-Saving Tips for […]

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Tips to Help Enjoy a Safe & Happy Holiday Season

While intended to be “merry and bright,” the holidays can be a stressful time for many of us. Check out the tips below to help enjoy a safe and happy holiday season.

Know someone who is depressed or suicidal? Get resources here.

happy holidays!

Life-Saving Tips for Holiday Party Planners

[Adapted from Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s holiday party tips]

  • Serve plenty of food and non-alcoholic drinks to help guests pace themselves.
  • Get the keys from your guests when they arrive.
  • Learn the basics about serving sizes of alcoholic drinks so you can drink responsibly.
  • Have a designated driver.
  • Don’t serve alcohol to minors!
  • Collect money from your guests for a taxi cab fare fund.
  • Have a phone number for a taxi company handy.
  • Plan to be a sober host or hostess so you can determine if your guests are able to
    drive home.
  • Stop serving alcohol one hour before the party ends.
  • Wait until a guest finishes a drink before you serve him/her another one.
  • Know the signs of intoxication.

More Holiday Tips

  • Know someone who is depressed? Get resources here. Know someone who may be suicidal? Get resources here.
  • Please don’t buy lottery tickets for kids.
  • If you’re entertaining, be sure to keep your prescription drugs in a safe place out of the way of visitors and young people.
  • Stressed? Try taking a 10 – 15 minute break every day over the holiday season to connect to and catch up with yourself.
    Try to keep perspective over the important things.
  • Get more stress-reducing tools from stress-busting expert Robin Rose.

If you need more help or resources, you are not alone. Click here for help line resources in Lane County and beyond.

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2014 Holidays – Lottery Stocking Stuffers for Kids Aren’t a Good Bethttp://www.preventionlane.org/gambling-holidays http://www.preventionlane.org/gambling-holidays#comments Fri, 05 Dec 2014 23:37:33 +0000 http://www.preventionlane.org/holidays/ Lottery Stocking Stuffers for Kids Aren’t a Good Bet So it’s just a lottery ticket, right? What’s the big deal? To answer the question, probably not a whole lot is a big deal. But did you know that 1) It’s illegal to buy Lottery tickets for anyone under 18, 2) kids who start gambling at […]

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Lottery Stocking Stuffers for Kids Aren’t a Good Bet

So it’s just a lottery ticket, right? What’s the big deal?

To answer the question, probably not a whole lot is a big deal. But did you know that 1) It’s illegal to buy Lottery tickets for anyone under 18, 2) kids who start gambling at a young age are far more likely to become problem gamblers later in life, and 3) as parents, we play the most important role in our kids’ future behaviors — not just drinking, drugs but also problem gambling?

lottery tickets aren't for kids

Okay, so do we have you yet? No?

Here’s the thing: Most problem gamblers report starting to gamble early on in life — and we can bet (pardon the pun) that they didn’t start off playing the craps tables in Vegas. We typically don’t think of lottery tickets as “gambling,” and yet we want to show kids that it’s hard work that gets us our dreams — not putting our money on chance.

We have a ton more reasons, but let’s face it, you’re busy– it’s the holidays, for crying out loud.

If you do want to read on, learn more about the risks of youth gambling and how to talk with your kids.

Check out the Oregon Lottery’s statement on responsible holiday giving.

Some of our non-Lottery kids stocking stuffer ideas:

  • Gum.
  • Anything that lights up or flashes.
  • Hot cocoa mix. Mmm…cocoa.
  • Ugly holiday socks (because some of us parents love the sound of the dreaded “sock sigh”). >:-)
  • Other ideas? Let us know!

The post 2014 Holidays – Lottery Stocking Stuffers for Kids Aren’t a Good Bet appeared first on Prevention Lane.

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